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Pendleton, South Carolina, United States

803-629-4917

A Place For Children to Learn

"Our Future Is Now"

Woking Together: Students, Teachers, Parents, and Community

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Encouraging Diversity in Charter Schools

 

The charter school model has been widely used to create school options for the most underserved children and communities. But now we’re seeing a growing interest from charter schools who are intentionally serving a balance of students who reflect the diversity of their larger community. Recent studies show that students from both low- and middle-income families benefit from diverse educational settings. Additionally, all students benefit from cross-racial and cross-cultural understanding as it lends to the decrease in bias and prejudice. 

The charter school model has been widely used to create school options for the most undeserved children and communities. But now we’re seeing a growing interest from charter schools who are intentionally serving a balance of students who reflect the diversity of their larger community. Recent studies show that students from both low- and middle-income families benefit from diverse educational settings. Additionally, all students benefit from cross-racial and cross-cultural understanding as it lends to the decrease in bias and prejudice.

(exert from Encouraging Diversity in Chater Schools  by HEIDI ANSPAUGH)

Serving the Hispanic Community

Growth of the Hispanic Community and the Roll Charter Schools Play

With over 12 million Hispanic children in American public schools today, it is clear that the Hispanic population will have a significant role in the country’s future.While district public schools still continue to serve the majority of Hispanic students, an increasing number of Hispanic families are choosing to enroll in charter public schools. As new charter schools continue to open their doors in neighborhoods with concentrated Hispanic populations, they are also investing in the future of the Hispanic community. 


The innovative and culturally responsive teaching practices provided in high-quality charter schools are not only providing Hispanic students with an excellent alternative to district public schools, but they are also yielding academic results that show neither race/ethnicity nor income level must determine a child’s future. Currently the fastest growing racial subgroup in the United States, Hispanics now make up 17 percent of the nation’s population. With one in three Hispanics in the United States today of school-going age, their presence is particularly pronounced in public schools. Roughly one-quarter of all public school students in 2014 identified as Hispanic—a number that is predicted to grow to about 30 percent by 2025. A recent parent survey commissioned by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools indicated Hispanics believe that, after the economy, education is the most important issue facing the nation. The same survey also found that school choice has become a significant priority within the Hispanic community. Almost 85 percent of Hispanic parents say they favor or strongly favor allowing parents to choose which public school their child attends, regardless of their address. The rising proportion of Hispanic students in charter schools tells us that Hispanic parents are beginning to recognize the advantages of charter schools.


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